Thursday, December 2, 2010

AMVOX2 Chronograph DBS

AMVOX2 Chronograph DBS - 192T450


Ah what is it about cars and watches?  Whether it’s co-branding, collaboration or ‘inspired by’, TAGs, Rolex Daytonas, Chopard Mille Miglia, Panerai Ferrari, Breitling for Bentley, Manometro, the list is endless, with even Spyker is getting in on the act with their own watch.

One of the more popular lines (and probably my personal favourite) is the JLC-Aston Martin AMVOX collaboration.

The modern partnership between Aston Martin and Jaeger-LeCoultre began in 2004 with the launch of the Aston Martin Jaeger-LeCoultre AMVOX1, reviving a link between the two companies going back to the 1930s, when Edmond Jaeger created dashboard instruments for cars such as the 1.5-litre Aston Martin LM.

Jaeger had established a company in the 1920s specialising in automotive dashboard instruments, and at its peak it is believed that 95% of car races were won by cars equipped with Jaeger counters.

I unexpectedly got to have a bit of a play with an AMVOX2 DBS Titanium recently.




Model number 192T450
Series Amvox2 DBS
Movement Automatic
Calibre Jaeger-LeCoultre 751E
Power Reserve 65 hours
Functions Hours, Minutes, Seconds, Date, Chronograph
Case Stainless Steel
Diameter 44 mm
Thickness 14 mm
Case Back Engraved Jaeger-LeCoultre and Aston Martin Logos
Crown Fluted Titanium
Bezel Fixed Titanium
Dial Color Black with Skeletal Display
Dial Markers Luminous Arabic Numeral
SubDials 30- Minute Counter, 12- Hour Counter Sub-dials
Hands Luminous
Bracelet Black Calfskin Leather
Clasp Titanium Deployment
Calendar Date displays between the 4 and 5 o'clock position
Water Resistant 50 meters/ 165 feet
Crystal Sapphire
Limited edition of 999 pieces



Comprising 427 parts, of which 130 are in the case and 25 the dial, and a patented chronograph method, it is a pretty damn attractive watch.

The dial contains all sorts of auto references (colours, surface effects etc) which are completely beyond me, but no doubt immediately visible to Aston Martin DBS aficionados. The crown’s design resembles the fuel-filler cap, for example.

The watch is equipped with the patented Jaeger-LeCoultre vertical-trigger chronograph system. This mechanism activates the chrono functions simply by pressing the crystal – the chronograph function can be started or stopped by pressing at 12 o’clock, whilst the counters are reset to zero by pressing at 6 o’clock.

To avoid accidentally starting or stopping the chronograph, a three-position selection device on the side of the case at 9 o’clock, serves to lock any of the functions at any time.


Although I see the point of this selection device, in reality when I was using the chrono, it required such a firm depressing of the crystal to start and stop the chronograph function that it is difficult to see how I could possibly accidentally start/ stop it.


Okay this isn’t the AMVOX2 DBS Transponder (of which there is definitely one, and rumour has it two, in Australia), but at a fraction of the price, with a fraction of the worries if something goes kaput, and in what I think is a more attractive titanium, this is a pretty cool watch itself, and one which I’d be more than happy to wear. The titanium makes it lightweight,  it's very legible, and sits comfortably on the wrist even at a 44mm size.



[AP]

3 comments:

initialjh said...

what a thick watch!!!

I do like this AMVOX but my personal preference would be for a vintage column wheel chrono @ 36mm and slim :)

Sam said...

I'm actually more of a fan of their "regular" Amvox 2 Models, which I feel design-wise is much cleaner, have a less-busy dial. Really like the Titanium black version. but alas it's sadly out of my price point by a long shot.

@initialjh- the watch actually doesn't wear that thick on the wrist...

Anonymous said...

Good post!

I think the "regular" Amvox 2 models are far less interesting, not to say boring. The touches of red which can be seen in this dial, and the various levels of complexity on the dial lift it aesthetically over the other variations.

The regular stainless steel version, while it is cleaner, is a very ordinary watch indeed, and a potential purchaser would be better to look for another model or another brand entirely if he was looking for a "clean" dial.

the Amvox 5 has the same interesting complexity in the dial.

Despite this variation being, imho, more interesting, I have to say that while it is easy to read the time, reading the chrono dials is difficult.

HB